Driving Simulator At NCC Showing Students, Others What It’s Like To Drive Drunk Or Distracted

Driving Sim1Sheldon, Iowa — So many people think “I can handle it” or “It’s no big deal…I will only take my eyes off the road for a second,” but the reality is that driving while texting or driving under the influence causes many serious accidents every year.

Right now until 1 PM, the Drunk Driving/Driving while Texting simulator is on NCC’s campus, in the cafeteria. NCC’s Kristi Landis tells us about the simulator.

She says it’s pretty realistic.

They are encouraging students, faculty and staff to try it out, but the community is welcome as well, says Landis. It’s free, and it could save a life.


Severe Weather Awareness Week Monday Topic: Flash Flooding

Flash flooding usgsSheldon, Iowa — This is Severe Weather Awareness Week In Iowa. Each day this week, the National Weather Service is focusing on a different severe weather topic.

Today’s topic is flash flooding.

Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other thunderstorm related hazard, resulting in more than 140 fatalities each year.

Most flash floods are caused by slow moving thunderstorms, thunderstorms that redevelop over the same area, or heavy rains from tropical storms and hurricanes. These floods can develop within minutes or hours depending on the intensity and duration of the rain, the topography, soil conditions, and ground cover.

A flash flood is a rapid rise of water along a stream or low-lying urban area. Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, destroy buildings and bridges, and scour out new channels. Rapidly rising water can reach heights of 30 feet or more. Flash flood-producing rains also can trigger catastrophic mudslides.

The Sioux Falls office of the National Weather Service covers our area of northwest Iowa. Todd Heitkamp, their Warning Coordination Meteorologist says flash flooding does indeed occur in our area.

He says people need to stay aware of what’s going on when severe weather is threatening or imminent.

Flash Flood Watch:

Issued by the National Weather Service to indicate current or developing hydrological conditions that are favorable for flash flooding in and close to the watch area. The occurrence of flooding is neither certain nor imminent. Those in the watch area should be alert for flooding.

Flash Flood Warning:

National Weather Service meteorologists have determined that flash flooding is occurring or imminent. Those in the warning area should take the necessary precautions at once.

Flash Flood Emergency:

A Flash Flood Emergency is issued by the National Weather Service. It is not a new warning, but is used to highlight a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage from a flash flood which is imminent or ongoing.

For more information, click here for the National Weather Service’s Flooding Brochure.

For severe weather safety and preparedness information in Spanish, please click here (en Español).

Para obtener información sobre la preparación de mal tiempo, haga clic aquí. (en español)


Extension Report Features Babysitting Clinic, FSQA Training and Extension Week

Jill PostmaIowa State University Extension and Outreach helps carry Iowa State’s land-grant mission beyond campus, to be the university that best serves the citizens of Iowa. With Iowa State University, Extension embraces the land-grant philosophy of:

  • access to high-quality education
  • research applied to the needs of Iowa, the nation, and world
  • extending knowledge to strengthen Iowa’s economy and citizens’ quality of life

Iowa State University Extension does that by offering practical, how-to education based on powerful university research. It’s available to any resident of Iowa and is tailored to meet the needs of Iowans, needs we know firsthand. Extension educators, specialists, and volunteers live and work in all 99 Iowa counties.

We recently spoke with Lyon County Extension Youth Coordinator Jill Postma about upcoming events including a babysitting clinic, FSQA training that some 4-H’ers need to take, and a Coffee Shoppe during Extension Week.

Click the play button (triangle) below to hear the report.


Spencer Man Transported To Hospital After Ocheyedan Area Accident

Osceola Sheriff Car
A Spencer man was injured in an accident near Ocheyedan on Thursday (3/21) and authorities are still looking for the other vehicle.

The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office reports that about 5:15 PM, 25-year-old Dustin Taylor of Spencer was driving a 1998 Volvo Semi eastbound on Highway 9, just west of Skyline Avenue near Willow Creek. The report says he crested a hill and observed another semi westbound in the eastbound lane. Taylor slammed on his brakes and swerved into the right ditch to avoid colliding with the other semi.

He ended up colliding with a tree. The second semi never stopped.

Taylor was transported by the Osceola County Ambulance Service to the Osceola Community Hospital.

The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office is investigating, trying to find the second semi that left the scene.


Extension Report Highlights Better Kid Care Series

Lori HayungsIowa State University Extension and Outreach helps carry Iowa State’s land-grant mission beyond campus, to be the university that best serves the citizens of Iowa. With Iowa State University, Extension embraces the land-grant philosophy of:

  • access to high-quality education
  • research applied to the needs of Iowa, the nation, and world
  • extending knowledge to strengthen Iowa’s economy and citizens’ quality of life

Iowa State University Extension does that by offering practical, how-to education based on powerful university research. It’s available to any resident of Iowa and is tailored to meet the needs of Iowans, needs we know firsthand. Extension educators, specialists, and volunteers live and work in all 99 Iowa counties.

We recently spoke with Extension Family Life Program Specialist Lori Hayungs about the Better Kid Care Series.

Click the play button (triangle) below to hear the report.


This Web Site Offers Free Translation To The Language Of Your Choice

KIWA SpanishSheldon, Iowa — We’re always changing and adding to our web site. The web site is kiwaradio.com. To address the fact that more and more people are moving to the area who do not speak English as their first language, we have made another addition.

KIWA Program Director Tom Traughber tells us about the new feature.

Traughber says the web site will always load in English first, but after you’ve chosen your language it will stay in that language until you choose another. Traughber gave us the directions for translating the site.

The translation is an automatic translation by Google. Traughber says the site can be translated into several languages.

Traughber tells us why KIWA decided to offer the translation feature.

Again, you can go to any page on kiwaradio.com, go to the bottom of the page, click translate and then the language in which you wan to view our site.