News

NOAA Winter Weather Predictions

National Weather Service NWS logoNorthwest Iowa — A hot topic of conversation this time of year in northwest Iowa is what the weatherman has in store for us during the upcoming winter months.

Forecasters at the NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center have now issued their U.S. Winter Outlook, favoring cooler and wetter weather in southern tier states, with above average temperatures most likely in the west and here in the northern tier of states.

This year’s El Nino, among the strongest on record, is expected to influence weather and climate patterns this winter by impacting the position of the Pacific jet stream.

The temperature predictions for our area, as shown by the map below, are predicted to be above normal.

TemperatureOutlook_Dec15-Feb16_610
National temperature outlook for December-February, issued October 15, 2015. Large version shows Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Colors indicate the probability of above- or below-average temperatures, not how far above or blow average the temperature is likely to be. White indicates equal chances for any outcome—above-, below-, or near-normal temperature—not a prediction of “normal” conditions. Map by NOAA Climate.gov, based on data from the Climate Prediction Center.

The prediction for precipitation levels for this winter for our area, as illustrated on the map below, can’t be accurately forecast at this time, says NOAA.

National precipitation outlook for December-February, issued October 15, 2015. Large version shows Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Colors indicate the probability of above- or below-average precipitation, not how far above or blow average the precipitation is likely to be. White indicates equal chances for any outcome—above-, below-, or near-normal precipitation—not a prediction of normal conditions. Map by NOAA Climate.gov, based on data from the Climate Prediction Center.
National precipitation outlook for December-February, issued October 15, 2015. Large version shows Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Colors indicate the probability of above- or below-average precipitation, not how far above or blow average the precipitation is likely to be. White indicates equal chances for any outcome—above-, below-, or near-normal precipitation—not a prediction of normal conditions. Map by NOAA Climate.gov, based on data from the Climate Prediction Center.
Previous ArticleNext Article